Baltimore surgeon shot during carjack attempt, admitted in own hospital, coworkers save him

On Friday morning, a trauma surgeon was repeatedly shot as he attempted to thwart a carjacking attempt in Northeast Baltimore, according to John Hopkins Medical. Baltimore Police Officers said that they found a man who had a gunshot wound in 1200 block of East 33rd street. He was found after 7 a.m. as he was proceeding to work at the John Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.

Although the authorities did not release further details, surgeon Joseph Sakran posted a series of tweets about the doctor—38-year old Madhu Subramanian who also works as a surgeon in the hospital ward he was admitted to.

The John Hopkins website says that Dr. Madhu Subramanian is an acute care surgeon. He specializes in burn treatment and management. He also conducts general surgery as well as trauma and critical care surgery. It is indeed both sad and ironic that he had to be treated for similar surgery by his co-workers.

Sakran posted that nothing prepared a surgeon when the person they had to take care of was “one of your own.” The surgeon who treated his fellow surgeon added that they were grateful that Dr. Madhu Subramanian had survived the horrific incident and that he would be “ok.”

 



Sakran is not only a surgeon but is also a gun advocate as he is a survivor of gun violence. He added that the physical wounds would heal much faster that the emotional trauma that would result after this type of a tragic accident.

John Hopkins sent an email to its staff, Friday evening. It was obtained by the Baltimore Sun. The email said that that they had taken permission from Dr. Madhu Subramanian, a trauma and acute care surgeon, to share the news that he “was on his way to work at John Hopkins Bayview Medical Center when the incident occurred near the 3600 block of Loch Raven Boulevard.”

The email also stated that they were thankful that Dr. Subramanian had not been seriously injured and that he had been “treated and released.” The email was signed by Paul B. Rothman, who is the CEO of Johns Hopkins Medicine and Kevin W. Sowers, Johns Hopkins Health System President.

(Photo: Twitter Mikenzie Frost)

 
 

Follow us on Google news for more updates and News










Full Disclaimer








>

FREE

Get the most important news and analyses for Free.

Thank you for subscribing.

Something went wrong.