Common Mistakes to Avoid When Rebranding Your Business

There’s no way that an employee can have decades of work experience and not a single participation in rebranding. You can like it or not, but it’s a fact that you’ll be facing it sooner or later. It’s a long process that takes planning and commitment along with some creativity. Rebranding consists of different processes, which most of the employees should be involved with. When there are many activities and many people involved, it’s almost guaranteed to encounter certain failures, and that’s completely fine, as long as you react on time. Thankfully, some of the mistakes can be easily avoided so make sure to check out what are the common ones and keep an eye on them!

Are you sure you need a rebrand?

Stop rushing into things just because you’ve heard it’s good and useful. If your business is having some issues, first you should try and see whether it’s some rare occasion that popped up and caused a problem or two, or if you’re having deeper and more consistent problems. Take some time and think about whether you really need a rebrand or not. It’s way more efficient to spend some time in the beginning and prevent possible time and money waste than rushing into something you don’t really need.

Don’t change the name just because you’re bored

The company’s logo and name are the first things that will visually affect any client. Having a strong yet easy-to-remember name can leave a great impact. However, it’s possible that your current name is the best one you can think of. Take a small break and try to figure out if your company’s name is on point at the moment. An unnecessary name change can cause your consumers to become angry if they take it as if you’ve taken away from them something important. Eventually, this behavior can lead to losing a lot of profit.

It’s not just about the visuals

As I’ve already mentioned, the name and the logo are very important since they usually represent the first step in the client-company relationship. That, however, doesn’t mean they are the only elements you should be paying attention to. Rebranding can mean that the change is happening from the bottom, affecting internal activities and strategies, all the way up to the top, affecting the visible things. Most importantly, the brand represents the entire company, everything they do and stand for.

Remember who you are

Because you’re here, I’ll assume that you are in a position in which you might eventually get involved or you’re already involved in rebranding your business. Let’s not forget what every business is fighting for – the market. Get to know the market and the buyers’ needs and opinions. There could be some elements of your current brand that are really effective and you should keep, but because of the fast-changing trends, you’ll probably need to change a lot of things along the way. According to the people who lead this bachelor’s degree in visual design, when using design for branding purposes, we should see it is the art of change, commitment and responsibility.

Never ignore successful ingredients

You’ve had some clientele, haven’t you? You’ve sold at least some of your products, right? This means that you were obviously doing something good. It’s not always a case that you need to get rid of every idea and product that you’ve had so far. Ignoring some of the elements that people enjoyed and creating a new brand without those elements can be fatal and can even lead to another rebranding.

Fully commit to it or don’t get into it at all!

Ever since we were kids, parents used to say “if you’re not going to finish it, don’t start it at all”. This is advice that we should obey at any age. If you abort the mission anywhere after the first third of the rebranding process will leave you with a lot of wasted money and time. You can’t get those back. 

Some of the mistakes may seem like nonsense to you, but way too many people have fallen for the same things. Sticking to simple rules and performing certain checkups from time to time can save a lot of resources. Just remember – don’t rush into things you haven’t planned yet.


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