Child hunger increases as COVID-19 continues to spread: Food Banks Worry about the continuing crisis

Like & Share us on Facebook.

 

 

 

 

Millions of people across the U.S. are struggling to feed themselves and their young ones. Food banks across the nations are doing their bit it’s not enough as the pandemic continues and more and more people are depending on these Food Banks, without which, they would go hungry to bed.

 

Feeding America, the nation ‘s largest anti-hunger organization says 17 million children among over 50 million people will face food shortages this year. This is an almost 50% increase from last year. The pandemic has made people who never ever visited a Food Bank become regulars due to shutting down of services, reduced working hours and job losses mainly from the service industry.

 

Although the hunger is prevalent throughout the country Weymouth County has seen the highest increase in child hunger — 168%— since 2018. The middle classes have been so severely affected for the first time.

 

Susan Dietrich, Pantry Director, Medway that the problem of food security needs to addressed in a better way instead of temporary solutions being used. The government funded SNAP helps but is insufficient and volunteers have to pitch in.

 

She feels that the world got together and tackled the coronavirus by developing a vaccine. In the same way, the world should get together to solve hunger issues.

 

D’Amato from the Greater Boston Food Bank says that hunger cannot go away “with an inoculation.” It needs “political will and individual will” to resolve it.

 

Source  


Follow us on Google news for more updates and News










Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.


CWEB.com is not registered as an investment adviser with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Rather, CWEB.com relies upon the “publisher’s exclusion” from the definition of investment adviser as provided under Section 202(a)(11) of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 and corresponding state securities laws.

Full Disclaimer