Elon Musk has already sent pairs of short shorts to David Einhorn and has message to all short traders. Don’t Mess with Tesla!

 

“Limited edition short shorts now available,” CEO Elon Musk tweeted on Sunday.

Elon Musk has already sent pairs of short shorts to David Einhorn, who has a big short position on Tesla (NASDAQ:TSLA), and announced a similar shipment destined for the SEC.

The shorts cost $69.420, the last three digits an apparent reference to Musk’s infamous tweet in 2018 that he was considering taking Tesla private for $420 per share, with 420 also a code word for cannabis.

As of mid-June, more than 15M shares of TSLA stock were being sold short and are currently valued at more than $18B, making Tesla by far the most shorted company by valuation on the Nasdaq.

In the second quarter, Tesla produced over 82,000 vehicles and delivered approximately
90,650 vehicles.
Production Deliveries Subject to lease accounting
Model S/X 6,326 10,600 14 %
Model 3/Y 75,946 80,050 4 %
Total 82,272 90,650 5 %
While our main factory in Fremont was shut down for much of the quarter, we have successfully ramped production back to prior levels.
Our net income and cash flow results will be announced along with the rest of our financial performance when we announce Q2 earnings. Our delivery
count should be viewed as slightly conservative, as we only count a car as delivered if it is transferred to the customer and all paperwork is correct.
Final numbers could vary by up to 0.5% or more. Tesla vehicle deliveries represent only one measure of the company’s financial performance and
should not be relied on as an indicator of quarterly financial results, which depend on a variety of factors, including the cost of sales, foreign exchange
movements and mix of directly leased vehicles.
Source: Tesla, Inc.

CWEB Analysts see   (TSLA) Nasdaq as a potential  for long term growth and a great addition to one’s portfolio and upward of $2000  by 2012

 

 

 

 

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