Mayo Clinic study says no link withCOVID-19  diagnosis and Vaping

 

 

The largest study ever taken place and  conducted by Mayo Clinic, a  U.S.-based academic medical organization which researched  and studied the health records of nearly 70,000 patients and did not find  a link between vaping and Covid-19 diagnosis.

“In contrast to the few prior studies that explored the association of e-cigarette use and Covid-19, we find no evidence that current or former e-cigarette users are more likely to be diagnosed,” the authors of the study reported.

Authored by Thulasee Jose, Ivana Croghan, J. Taylor Hays, Darrell R. Schroeder and David O. Warner of Mayo Clinic, the analysis tested the hypothesis that e-cigarette use was associated with an increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients seeking medical care.

 

The  media  had previously reported links to Covid risks were becoming clear due to Vaping . Mayo Clinic study analyzed clinical cohort and used self-reported e-cigarette use data that were confirmed and documented in electronic health record by a clinician. Covid-19 diagnosis in the Mayo Clinic study was also confirmed using a diagnostic PCR test.

 

“This analysis affirms prior studies that conventional cigarette smokers are underrepresented in the population of patients diagnosed with Covid-19,” according to the authors.

 

“Although e-cigarettes have the well-documented potential for harm, and the Covid-19 pandemic presents an opportunity to reduce e-cigarette use, our study found that such use does not appear to increase susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection among patients seeking medical care. This result suggests the hypothesis that any effects of conventional cigarette smoking on susceptibility are not mediated by nicotine. Future work should evaluate whether e-cigarette use could moderate COVID-19 outcomes,” the authors of the study concluded.

The study concluded in  the second logistic regression model when inhaled tobacco use was included as a single variable, patients who used only e-cigarettes were not more likely to have a Covid-19 diagnosis while those who smoked  only cigarettes had a decreased risk.


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