States across the U.S. declare emergency and activate National Guard to control omicron spread

The omicron variant of the coronavirus is continuing to spread across the states in the nation and New Jersey and Virginia have entered states of emergency. Kentucky has mobilized the National Guard to help the state cope with the surge in COVID-19 cases. Although there is a huge surge in the number of cases there has not been a surge in deaths or even in hospitalizations, as was seen earlier, with other variants.

According to the Daily Mail the infection rates as per data obtained for every 100,000 residents in the last two weeks are as follows:

Rhode Island—507
Virginia—200
New Jersey—350
New York—378
Massachusetts—359
Kentucky—188.

The Daily Mail also gave the percentage increase instead of the number of cases per 100,000 over the past two weeks for some states which are as follows:

South Carolina—842 percent
Arkansas—455 percent
Alabama—392 percent
Oklahoma—376 percent
North Carolina—328 percent
Mississippi—301 percent.

As the number of COVID-19 cases are rising exponentially, the number of deaths are less. Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) thinks that the U.S. average of 1,700 deaths per day is mainly due to the delta variant and not the omicron variant.

On Wednesday, the CDC released data that Covid infections due to omicron had a 50 percent less chance of hospitalization for infected people. The omicron variant was also less likely to cause death due to a COVID infection by 91 percent.

The UK has seen a 45 percent decrease in new infections in a week. This indicates that the omicron has peaked. The U.S. is a few weeks behind the U.K. as far as pandemic patterns are concerned and the infections in the nation’s could start declining in a few weeks. However, it should be noted that there will be different rates of peaks as well as different rates of decline in different states across the U.S. 

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