Top Google Searches In 2020: How People Browsed in 2020

 

 

On Wednesday, Google released its annual “Year in Search.” This year, the year of the pandemic, has brought up a plethora of searches from weird too anxious to ways to help. The list features trop trending searches in 2020, whose traffic spiked through a long period of time, when compared with 2019.

Some of the top searches are as follows:

  1. The word “Why?” The more common queries searched using this word was “Why is the NBA postponed? and “Why is toilet paper sold out?
  2. Election results also trended as the long drawn out period between elections and the delays, warranted and unwarranted in declaring them, made people query about this very often.
  3. Coronavirus was a word that entered the lexicon of many. The pandemic spread far and wide and affected the entire world making it and related words searched very often.

Google also categorized searches as per trends

In the news category it was the stimulus check. General Qasem Soleimani trended while giant invasive bugs were searched many times. Natural disasters including Hurricane Laura and Australia Fires also trended.

The year 2020  we saw a few losses of personalities who died due to accidents and illnesses. Kobe Bryant, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Eddie Van Halen and George Floyd were the people who were searched the most.

One heartening search trend was the fact that many people searched for ways to help one another in the “How to Help” section. Black Lives Matter, Yemen, Beirut, someone having a panic attack, how to donate blood, plasma and N95 masks showed the better and caring side of humanity.

Source CNN Business

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