Capitol Police officer injured after clashing with pro-Trump rioters dies

 

 

 

The ugly clashes between the pro-Trump mob and the police has resulted in the death of a Capitol Police officer. A U.S. officer, Brian D. Sicknick, was injured on duty when he was trying to prevent a huge mob of violent protesters from disrupting the proceedings at the Capitol on Wednesday.

 

As per Capitol Police spokeswoman Eva Malecki, the officer returned to his division office. He collapsed at the office and was taken to a local hospital. On Thursday, he died at around 9.30 p.m..

 

The officer is the fifth person who died as a consequence of the rioting in Washington DC. He joined the Capitol in 2008. After twelve years of service, he was injured in the line of duty and succumbed to his injuries.

 

The U.S. Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund has resigned. The head of the department’s union had also criticized the way events had unfolded on what was generally considered to be a ceremonial occurrence at the Capitol. He also asked for a “change at the top.”

 

Many have criticized Sund’s handling of the riot situation. Rioters managed to break through barricades, vandalize buildings and violently clash with the police, under his watch. The news of the officer’s death was released after his resignation. He will relinquish his post on January 16, before Joe Biden’s inauguration on January 20, 2021.

 

Officials said that to date that five persons have died as a result of the violent clashes. An Air Force veteran and Trump supporter was fatally shot by the Capitol Police. Three others died due to “medication emergencies,” and the fifth was the police officer Brian D. Sicknick.

Image Credit Twitter AJC

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